As the excessive heat warning continues in the Mid-Columbia, it easy to overdo it outside in a very short period of time. That goes for your pets, too. If you have a dog or two, especially smaller dogs that are mostly indoors, you know that they love to bask in the sun. You also know that since they want in, then want out, then want in, then want out...it's easy to close the door to the yard and get busy doing something else until you hear them bark or scratch the door. With temps well into the 100s this weekend, this could be deadly. Here are some signs your pet is suffering heatstroke:

  • Dogs pant to keep cool so watch for excessive panting.
  • Drooling more than usual. This might be hard to spot in naturally 'drooly' dogs.
  • Walking or acting 'woozy.' Almost drunk-like.This can be a definite sign of heat exhaustion.
  • Check your dog's gums, they may be discolored or unusually red.
  • Vomiting or diarrhea.

Organ failure can result from overheating, so if the symptoms are severe, get your pup to the vet right away. Make sure there's always fresh water for your pets, and a special treat is to put chicken broth ice cubes in it. If they must be outside, make sure there's enough shade for them. Playing in the sprinkler is always a great way to cool pets down. Even a spray bottle will help unless your dog has seen you torture your cat with it!

LOOK: Here Are 30 Foods That Are Poisonous to Dogs

To prepare yourself for a potential incident, always keep your vet's phone number handy, along with an after-hours clinic you can call in an emergency. The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center also has a hotline you can call at (888) 426-4435 for advice.

Even with all of these resources, however, the best cure for food poisoning is preventing it in the first place. To give you an idea of what human foods can be dangerous, Stacker has put together a slideshow of 30 common foods to avoid. Take a look to see if there are any that surprise you.

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