Washington State Patrol is warning residents about a scam tricking people into providing information.

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Scammers are using multiple WSP phone numbers and identifying themselves as a trooper, officer, or detective with the agency. The scammer tells the unsuspecting victim that their ID was used in another state or country. Then the scammer gets the person to submit the "correct" information for "verification."

If it doesn't feel right, it's not. Hang UP.
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The scammers go so far as to tell the person to look on their caller ID and telling the victim to, "Google it." They'll also provide a fake case number to get the caller to believe that they are with WSP. Really though, they are NOT.

DO NOT Fall FOR THIS. IT IS A SCAM.

Never give you information out. WSP will NEVER call seeking personal or financial information. You are urged to HANG UP. Then call 911 to report it.

WSP is actively investigating the situation but this sort of crime often originates overseas and is very difficult to solve and prosecute. Knowledge is your best defense.

NEVER give your personal or financial information to a stranger. If it doesn't feel right, it's not. Hang UP.

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